Restoration Projects on Cameron Creek

In an effort to address TMDLs* for sediment and temperature on the East Fork of the Bitterroot River, BRWF partnered with private landowners on Cameron Creek, one of the warmest tributaries entering the East Fork of the Bitterroot River, to do on the ground restoration projects to reduce stream temperatures.

 

With the help of almost 75 volunteers, in 2013 BRWF put 1,500 native plants in the ground along Cameron Creek, one of the warmest tributaries to the East Fork of the Bitterroot River. The project also included the installation of 1,000 feet of natural erosion control logs to help stabilize stream banks and reduce erosion, planting more than 1,000 willow sprigs, and installing nearly 800 feet of riparian fencing to limit the potential for grazing on the healthy new plants.

In 2016 volunteers added additional willow sprigs and erosion control logs to bolster the existing project and continue treatment on similar banks of the stream.

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These projects are part of an ongoing effort by BRWF to reduce stream temperatures in the East Fork Bitterroot River.

 

After 450 hours of hard work—cutting, digging, planting, and watering—volunteers were able to help BRWF complete two-large scale restoration projects on Cameron Creek, one of the warmest tributaries entering the East Fork of the Bitterroot River. THANK YOU for volunteering your time allowing BRWF to make the biggest restoration impact possible!

 

*A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) is the maximum amount of a pollutant that a waterbody can receive and still meet its water quality standards. Thus, a TMDL calculates the maximum amount of a pollutant allowed to enter a waterbody so that the waterbody will meet, and continue to meet, water quality standards for that particular pollutant.